Maintaining the Momentum after the High-level Dialogue on International Migration and Development: Give Migrants a Place in the Post-2015 Development Agenda


Post date: 
14/10/2013 - 11:00pm
Author: 
Anonymous

The Global Migration Group (GMG) welcomes the outcomes of the second United Nations (UN) 

High-level Dialogue on International Migration and Development which took place at the UN General 

Assembly in New York on 3 and 4 October 2013. 

 

The Declaration adopted at the High-level Dialogue broke new ground, expressing a strong 

convergence of views and opening a new chapter in multilateral cooperation on migration. The broad 

areas of consensus that emerged – placing priority on the human and labour rights of all migrants 

and their families with emphasis on the most vulnerable, the need to integrate migrants and migration 

in the new global development agenda, and the recognition that migration matters for all countries – 

matched the recommendations presented by the GMG in advance of the Dialogue. The GMG is also 

encouraged by the substantive nature of the discussions and the spirit of cooperation and partnership 

that characterized the two-day meeting as well as the months of preparation that preceded it. 

On the occasion of International Migrants Day 2013, which marks the day of the adoption of the 

International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their 

Families, the GMG calls for a migrant-centred approach to migration governance that recognizes 

human rights and development as two sides of the same coin. 

“Migrants – the main protagonists in the migration-development debate – must be at the centre of our 

attention” said the current Chair of the GMG, Director General of the International Organization for 

Migration William Lacy Swing, in his address to the General Assembly in October. “A few years from 

now, we would like to be working in a world in which all States are committed to the human and 

labour rights of migrants and their families in law and in practice, with a focus on the most 

vulnerable.” 

The GMG is committed to turning words into actions following the High-level Dialogue and urges 

governments and other partners to move in the same direction. A key priority in the immediate future 

is the inclusion of migration and migrants in the post-2015 UN development agenda. 

Migration can be an enabler of development for individuals and societies alike. Migration allows 

individuals and families to diversify livelihoods, manage risks, adapt to environmental and economic 

shocks, and seek freedom and opportunities. Remittances, for instance, have lifted millions of 

families out of poverty and improved their access to education and health. In countries of destination, 

migrant workers rejuvenate workforces, create businesses, expand tax bases, contribute to social 

security systems, and keep entire sectors of industry and services afloat. 

At the High-level Dialogue, Member States and civil society representatives called for fully integrating 

migration into the post-2015 UN development agenda. Since the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals in 2000, the case for including migration in the future UN development agenda 

has become stronger and more urgent. Human mobility has increased, as demographic trends have 

diverged and inequalities have deepened. With high youth unemployment, the prospect of further 

economic shocks and environmental disasters, and a global competition for skills and talent, a 

collaborative global approach to migration and development is needed more than ever. 

To be truly beneficial migration must take place in safety and dignity and with full A key priority in the immediate future 

is the inclusion of migration and migrants in the post-2015 UN development agenda. 

Migration can be an enabler of development for individuals and societies alike. Migration allows 

individuals and families to diversify livelihoods, manage risks, adapt to environmental and economic 

shocks, and seek freedom and opportunities. Remittances, for instance, have lifted millions of 

families out of poverty and improved their access to education and health. In countries of destination, 

migrant workers rejuvenate workforces, create businesses, expand tax bases, contribute to social 

security systems, and keep entire sectors of industry and services afloat. 

At the High-level Dialogue, Member States and civil society representatives called for fully integrating 

migration into the post-2015 UN development agenda. Since the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals in 2000, the case for including migration in the future UN development agenda has become stronger and more urgent.